Build Second Comprehensive High School

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    LRFPC Recommendation
    The committee has recommended that the district move forward with building a second comprehensive high school.

    HS Enrollment

     

    DSHS Capacity and Projected High School Growth 

    • Right now, DSHS is at 93% capacity. 
    • The campus is projected to be at or above 122% capacity by the 2025-2026 school year and 133% capacity the following year (2026-2027). 
    • It takes approximately 4 years to design and construct a comprehensive high school.

     

    The Committee's Process
    The LRFPC spent a significant amount of time exploring the options available to DSISD to support the growth that is coming. The committee looked at models from across the state and studied 5 different high school pathways including:

    • Build a second comprehensive high school
    • Continue to expand Dripping Springs High School (currently built to support 2,500 students)
    • Construct a ninth-grade center
    • Build separate campuses for 9/10 and 11/12 grades
    • Implement a choice campus concept. 

     

    High School Pathways Considered (PDF)

    Recommendation Rationale 
    The committee made the recommendation to build a second comprehensive high school because:

    • Build a Second Comprehensive High School (Recommended)
      • In considering campus size, the committee strongly preferred a 2,500 student capacity for high school campuses.
      • DSISD's high school enrollment is expected to climb to more than 4,000 students by 2029-30 and more than 7,300 students once the district is built-out.
      • 7,300 student high school enrollment would require three 2,500-student capacity campuses.
      • Traffic could be better dispersed with a second high school on the east side of the district.

    • Continue to Expand Dripping Springs High School
      • Campus would need to support the estimated 7,300 high school students in Dripping Springs ISD.
      • Would contribute to already congested traffic in the community and around the high school campus (especially on 290 and RR12). 
      • Limits total student involvement in programming and extracurriculars.
      • Large building footprint requires longer passing periods for students and extends the school day. 
      • Insufficient land to expand DSHS to support the growth.

    • Construct a Ninth-Grade Center
      • Only a temporary solution for the district.
      • Most ninth-grade campuses are in close proximity to a high school and that is not a viable option for DSISD.
      • Limits schedule for students who want to pursue advanced programming and extracurricular opportunities.
      • Creates a need for additional bussing of students for acceleration.
      • Would add an additional transition for students. Can create challenges for families with siblings at more school sites.
      • Will still need additional expansion of facilities to accommodate the total projected growth.

    • Build Separate Campuses for 9/10 and 11/12 Grades
      • Can cost as much as a second comprehensive high school to build.
      • Limitations around land and proximity.
      • Limits schedule for students who want to pursue advanced programming and extracurricular opportunities.
      • Creates a need for additional bussing of students for acceleration.
      • Would add an additional transition for students. Can create challenges for families with siblings at more school sites.
      • Sites not central in the community and could perpetuate transportation issues.
      • Will still need additional expansion of facilities to accommodate the total projected growth.

    • Implement a Choice Campus Concept
      • Smaller program model. It does not address total high school student growth needs.
      • Most districts that deploy this model draw from many high schools. 
      • Would not provide a comprehensive high school experience for students.
      • Would not improve traffic congestion.
      • By nature, this model limits student programming and extracurriculars.

     

    What is included in a comprehensive high school?
    The second comprehensive high school would include a main campus with similar type student programming including core spaces, academics, fine arts, and athletics. Standard athletic facilities at a high school include competition gym spaces and practice/competition fields with small spectator stands for soccer, lacrosse, and sub-varsity football. The site would also include baseball and softball fields, track facilities, and tennis courts. 

    HS Enrollment Table

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Dripping Springs High School Aerial

    DSHS

     


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